What Are Dental Implant Crowns?

What Are Dental Implant Crowns?

Not everyone is lucky enough to have healthy teeth all of their lives. Sometimes, a permanent tooth can become fractured, decayed, or infected from lack of dental care, a sports accident, or another mishap. Whatever the reason, teeth sometimes need to undergo restoration, often involving implant crowns.
What are implant crowns? Many people have heard of implants and crowns but never implant crowns. We will explain what both implants and crowns are, how they are related, and more to help you better understand this successful procedure.

Not everyone is lucky enough to have healthy teeth all of their lives. Sometimes, a permanent tooth can become fractured, decayed, or infected from lack of dental care, a sports accident, or another mishap. Whatever the reason, teeth sometimes need to undergo restoration, often involving implant crowns.
What are implant crowns? Many people have heard of implants and crowns but never implant crowns. We will explain what both implants and crowns are, how they are related, and more to help you better understand this successful procedure.

What Are Dental Implants?

Dental implants are used to replace missing teeth. They act as prosthetic roots, holding an artificial tooth in place. An abutment is then attached to the implant. The abutment is used to secure a dental crown, a fixed bridge, or a full arch of teeth.

What Are Dental Crowns?

Dental crowns are porcelain caps that look just like natural teeth. They are placed over a tooth that is badly decayed, has a large fracture, or has undergone a root canal to protect the tooth from wear and tear caused by biting or chewing. Dental cement keeps the crown in place—they are not attached below the gum line like implants.

Dental crowns are used when it’s impossible to restore the tooth using fillings—typically because of the extent of damage the tooth has endured.

How Is A Dental Crown And Dental Implant Related?

Dental crowns and implants are related because dentists can use them to create a replacement tooth; a dental crown is screwed onto the abutment of an implant, making an artificial tooth from root to extremity. The end result is a permanent replacement tooth that looks and feels like the remaining natural teeth.

Although a crown is not part of an implant, it is essential for treatment. It provides support to nearby teeth, protects gums, maintains an aligned bite, and allows patients to smile with confidence.

How Is A Dental Implant Crown Made?

The dentist will take a mould of the patient’s natural tooth to ensure that the implant matches the shape and size of their other teeth. They will also complete a colour match to ensure that the implant crown matches the colours of their own teeth. Then the dentist will send the information away to a lab that fabricates implants, like Dentistry On Wellington.

The lab will use the collected information to fabricate the crown. Crowns are made of a biocompatible material to ensure that the new tooth does not negatively affect the patient’s oral health. They are typically made of metal and porcelain fused together. The crown is made to match the shape and colour of the patient’s real teeth. That way, they can smile, bite, and chew easily.

The Dental Implant Crown Placement Procedure

1. Initial Consultation

First, the dentist will need to determine if the patient is a good candidate for dental implant surgery. They will take X-rays, speak to them about the treatment, and decide whether it’s a worthwhile procedure for them. First, the dentist will need to determine if the patient is a good candidate for dental implant surgery. They will take X-rays, speak to them about the treatment, and decide whether it’s a worthwhile procedure for them.

2. Tooth Extraction or Jawbone Graft (Optional)

Dental implants require tooth solid jawbone for support. If bone deterioration has occurred, the patient will need a bone graft to encourage new bone growth before placing the implant.

Similarly, tooth loss is required for an implant. If the patient still has dead or broken teeth, they will need to be extracted first. An existing tooth (or teeth) can be easily removed in one appointment.

Following either extraction or grafting, the patient will need to wait several weeks before their next appointment. The waiting period will ensure they can heal properly before implant placement.

3. Implant Placement

The dentist will insert a titanium post into the jaw bone during the procedure to replace the tooth root from a missing tooth. The post will fuse with the bone to create a secure base for the implant.

Dental implant surgery can be quite invasive. Thankfully, dentists will provide patients with local anesthesia to make them comfortable and relaxed during treatment.

4. The Healing Process

After surgery, patients will wait several weeks for their implant to heal and fuse to their jawbone. They will need to practice good oral hygiene to mitigate infection during this time.

5. Crown Placement

Once the dentist has confirmed the titanium post is secured to the bone, they will begin. A small incision will be made in the healthy gums to allow the dentist to screw the abutment onto the post.

Next, The crown will be screwed onto the abutment, replacing the missing teeth. The crown benefits the patient’s overall health as the new teeth stop the remaining teeth from shifting to fill the gap in the mouth. This is essential for maintaining both aligned bite and gum health.

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